Rodaways of ww1-2

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                                               ROYAL  LAUNCHING   1936

                                          
   

                                                        Prins Albert 193

OPERATION AERIAL - Evacuation from Western France, June 1940

                                   

http://www.naval-history.net/xDKWDa-Aerial.htm

 History    
Completed as passenger ship in 1937.
Requisitioned by the Royal Navy on 24 July 1940 and converted to an LSI(S).
Displacement: 2938 tons.
Lenght: 370 feet
Complement: 200
Machinery: 2 Shafts, Diesel engines, SHP 17000 = 23 knots.
Armament: 2 12pdr AA guns (2x1), 2 2pdr AA (2x1), 6 20mm AA (6x1)
Carried 8 LCA's and 250 troops

Returned in April 1946.

 

                  evacuation of troops by the Belgian channel-ferries June 1940,

   HISTORY OF HMS PRINS ALBERT,LSI ( s )-435 

 http://www.maritimequest.com/                

The 'Prins Albert' was built, clocking 25,5 knots on trails off the West Hinder lightship. In World War II she took part in different raids all over the world and was attacked by German U-boats so rightly earning her nickname of 'Lucky Albert'. She was withdrawn in 1968. Broken up in 1970

H B Peate (Henry Benjamin)   Rank:Commander RD RNR
DSC: Excellent write-up in the reference, including photographs Suffered burns after a fire in his ship: took up tapestry to keep his fingers supple, and remained an active needleman thereafter
Date:21.12.43 Unit:HMS Prins Albert (LSI) C.O. Where:Operation "Husky" Gazette number:

Comment:Mentioned in Despatches 4 times.Retired as Capt RNR; died October 1989
Sources
http://www.unithistories.com/

 

THE LUCKY PRINS ALBERT

 reprinted from the evening standard October 6,1944

         LUCKY ALBERT
       LANDED
     OVER 20,000 MEN
       WAS NEVER HIT

THE PRINS ALBERT, a former cross-channel  passenger ship belonging to 
the BELGIAN STATE RAILWAYS, has taken part in most of the major landing
operations in the EUROPEAN THEATRE.
       CARRYING OVER 20,000 officers and men ,she has had many narrow
escapes-they call her "LUCKY ALBERT" -but she has never been hit.
        the PRINS ALBERT was taken over in 1941 and converted into a landing
ship.
she took part in the raids on the LOFOTEN ISLANDS,and BRUNEVAL.
and then DIEPPE,the next operation one of her landing craft took 
LORD LOVAT and his adjutant to the beaches, it was a hazardous trip of
about 50 yards. the craft was under fire from about 20 machine guns nests
and a mortar,  but leading seaman T.W. PATTERSON  from SUNDERLAND
fired over 1000 rounds from a oerlikon and silenced 6 or 7 of the nests.
 
BEACH FIGHTING
 next came the NORTH AFRICAN  landing and the SICILION campaign
and she also saw action at SALERNO, CATANIA, BRINDISI, PALERMO,
TARANTO, AUGUSTA, SYRACUSE, AND TRIPOLI,
       THE catanion trip was the most exciting, said PETTY-OFFICER
telegraphist K.J.DEARSON of SOUTHPORT,
       WE had to land the commandos just south of CATANIA to help the
eighth army ,who were being held up on the plains,  they were to meet an
airborne division and prevent the enemy capturing or blowing up some 
bridges,
       THE commandos ran into the HERMANN GOERING DIVISION
on the beaches, and there was some very fierce fighting,  our chaps got
through and held the bridges until the eighth army came along,
      Meanwhile, the PRINS ALBERT  had been attacked by Severn E-BOATS
and a torpedo missed her by about two feet, we opened fire and then our
escort  destroyer H.M.S. TETCOTT came along and sank one of the e-boats
with her first salvo, the whole of the operation lasted about eight hours'
     THE PRINS ALBERT came home in 1943 and trained ROYAL MARINE
COMMANDOS for the invasion of NORMANDY,during this campaign
the PRINS ALBERT  made eight ferrying trips carrying troops and units
of the AMERICAN fighter group.
    she then went to the Mediterranean for the invasion of the south of FRANCE
       among the ship's company are PETTY-OFFICER L.R BEECH of
      BOURNMOUTH,  ORDINARY-SEAMAN W.F.RODAWAY OF LIVERPOOL
ABLE-SEAMAN H.WEIR OF PORTSMOUTH, CHEF YEOMAN of SIGNALS
H.J.MANN,OF PORTSMOUTH AND SICK BERTH ATTENDANT W.E HARNER

Combined Operations Prayer

O LORD GOD, our Father, our Saviour, our Might,
we pray Thee take into Thy keeping us who are joined together in a trinity of arms on sea, on land, and in the air in this our special service for King and Country.

We pledge ourselves to do, to dare, to die that others might live, believing in Him who said; "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends."

Grant us faith, courage, and determination that we fail not in whatever duty may lie before us, and may we be enabled by Thy Divine Grace to bear our part in establishing peace on earth and goodwill amongst men.

This we ask for Jesus Christ, His sake.
Amen

 http://www.combinedops.com/index.htm

                          LOFOTEN RAID    ANKLET   DEC 1941
ESCORT DESTROYERS  HMS WHEATLAND  L122
AND HMS OAKLEY L72 SHE WAS HANDED OVER TO THE POLISH NAVY AND RENAMED  ORP KUJAWIAK  SUNK 16 JUNE 1942  BY A MINE OFF MALTASISTER SHIP AND ALSO HANDED OVER TO POLISH NAVY HMS SILVERTON  RENAMED ORP KRAKOWIAK  NO BATTLE HONOURS AS THEY WERE BOTH HANDED OVER


Volunteers for No 12 Commando gathered in Belfast and Londonderry and marched the 67 miles to Crumlin where the unit was formed on 5th August 1940 under C.O. Lt. Col S.S. Harrison MC & bar (nickname Peachy).
The naval force formed for Operation Anklet consisted of 22 ships from three navies. The Royal Navy provided the most ships which included the light cruiser HMS Arethusa; six destroyers (HMS Somali, Ashanti, Bedouin, Eskimo, Lamerton and Wheatland); three minesweepers (HMS Speedwell, Harrier and Halcyon); two Landing Ship Infantry (HMS Prins Albert and Prinses Josephine Charlotte); the submarines HMS Tigris, HMS Sealion; and the survey ship HMS Scott. The Royal Fleet Auxiliary provided two fleet tankers (RFA Grey Ranger and Black Ranger); the freighter Gudrun Maersk; and the Tugboat Jaunty.

The exiled Royal Norwegian Navy provided the corvettes HNoMS Andenes and Eglantine, while the Polish Navy provided the destroyers OORP Krakowiak and Kujawiak.

The landing force was supplied by 223 men of No. 12 Commando, supported by 77 men of the Norwegian Independent Company 1

The naval task force was assembled at three locations: Scapa Flow, Greenock and Lerwick. The task force, now known as Force J, left Scapa and Greenock for the Lofoten Islands on Monday 22 December, and those at Lerwick the following day. En route to join up with the main force, the infantry landing ship Prinses Josephine Charlotte developed engine trouble, and together with her destroyer escort Wheatland was sent back to Scapa, arriving on 24 December. Wheatland left Scapa alone on 25 December to catch up with the rest of Force J.As the task force approached the islands, the submarine Sealion was already in position to act as a navigational beacon for the attack, which was planned for 26 December.

When the task force arrived, the infantry landing ship Prins Albert, escorted by destroyer Lamerton and corvettes Eglantine and Acanthus, headed towards Moskenesøya to land the commandos. Some of the other ships conducted operations around the islands. The destroyer Bedouin destroyed a radio station at Flakstadøya, while the cruiser Arethusa and destroyers Somali, Ashanti, and Eskimo entered the Vestfjorden. Here they captured the Norwegian coastal steamers Kong Harald and Nordland and Ashanti sank a German patrol boat.

The 300-man landing force landed at 06:00 on Boxing Day. The date had been selected by British planners, who expected the German garrison to be concentrating on the Christmas festivities and would therefore be caught unprepared.The landings were unopposed as the commandos, dressed in white camouflaged overalls, were landed on the western side of the island of Moskenesøya. They soon occupied the villages of Reine and Moskenes, capturing the small German garrison and a number of Norwegian Quislings at the radio station at Glåpen.

The raiding force was attacked on 27 December 1941 by a German seaplane that bombed the cruiser Arethusa. Although it was not hit, it did suffer some damage that would require 14 weeks in dock to repair. With no air support of their own, the commander of the raid, Admiral Hamilton, having occupied the Norwegian villages for two days, decided to pull out and head back to Scapa, where they arrived on 1 January 1942
                                             HMS SCOTT                              HM SUBMARINE SEALION

http://www.uboat.net/allies/warships/ship/3422.html 

                                 

                                  

                             HMS KENYA LIGHT CRUISER

                                                             

 REPORT  FROM HMS KENYA, DEC  1941
December 3rd   Detached from QP4 and took passage to Rosyth. 6Arrived at Rosyth and taken in hand for routine maintenance and installation of steam piping  to reduce effects of icing on upper deck equipmen   Radar Type 284 for main armament was fitted and Type 273 installed in place of Type 271.  8th   Rating killed by fall into dry dock. 15th On completion took passage to resume Fleet duties and deployed for preparatory exercise prior  to providing gunfire support during planned commando raid on Lofoten islands by No 3 an  No 4 Commando 24th  Sailed from Scapa Flow with HM Destroyers ONSLOW, OFFA, ORIBI and CHIDDINGFOLD as escort for HM Landing Ships (Infantry) PRINCE CHARLES and PRINS ALBERT to carry out  landings at Vaagso and Malloy with air support (Operation ARCHERY)

  (Note: Military commander, Brigadier J C Haydon was embarked.) 25th Forced to shelter at Sullom Voe in Shetlands by adverse weather conditions which had caused damage to HMS PRINCE CHARLES. Operation postponed by 24 hours. 26th   Resumed passage covered against surface attack by ships of Home Fleet. 27th  Royal Marines detachment embarked in Landing Craft (Personnel) specially carried on board for this operation. Provided naval gunfire support prior to landings by Commando units and Royal Marines   Sustained damage from return fire from shore battery which was then permanently silence  Came under sporadic air attacks/

        (Note: Norwegian troops and Royal Engineers also took part in the landings.)

 December 26, 1941

 
Operation Anklet. 22 warships from Britain, Norway and Poland raid the Lofoten Islands (Northwest Norway, 100 miles inside the Arctic Circle). At 6 AM, 223 British Commandos and 77 Norwegian troops land on the island of Moskenesøya from British landing ship HMS Prins Albert (escorted by Norwegian corvettes HNoMS Andenes and Eglantine), take several German & Norwegian Quisling prisoners and destroy a radio transmitter at Glåpen. British destroyer HMS Bedouin shells a radio transmitter at Flakstadøya. In Vestfjord, British cruiser HMS Arethusa and destroyers HMS Somali, Ashanti, and Eskimo capture 2 Norwegian coastal steamers and sink a German patrol boat (after capturing the Enigma machine and code settings).

Before that - Jan 1st, 1942 12.30 hrs Prins Albert anchored at Scapa Flow, 7th Personnel from PA go on leave, retuning 20th , 26th No 12 Commando embarked Ayr, disembarked Dunoon 12.30 hrs

in April two troops of No.4 Commando and eight officers and 43 other ranks of the Carleton and York Regiment (Canadian 1st Division) took part in Abercrombie, a raid on Hardelot, France, near Boulogne. The LCA of HMS Prins Albert transported the party. This raid also marked the first operational use of the new LCS.[ The raid set out on the night of 19 April with the LCA being towed by Motor Gun Boats (MGBs). The procedure was for the party to travel to within two miles of the French coast on the MGBs and then to transfer to the LCA for the landing. Due to high seas and strong winds, which swamped and sank LCA 211, the raid was stopped with the loss of two naval ratings. The raid was remounted two nights later in calmer seas, but the period of optimum tide, moon, and darkness had past. The raid became uncoordinated, and whilst the Commandos got ashore and began their mission, the boats with the regular infantry became lost. Soon a German E-Boat was engaged by the MGBs. The army officers in the LCA conferred and decided not to disembark. Aboard the LCS, the senior naval officer?s compass failed, and the flotilla only returned to England steered by Lt. Groom?s army compass.

 
Operation Anklet. 22 warships from Britain, Norway and Poland raid the Lofoten Islands (Northwest Norway, 100 miles inside the Arctic Circle). At 6 AM, 223 British Commandos and 77 Norwegian troops land on the island of Moskenesøya from British landing ship HMS Prins Albert (escorted by Norwegian corvettes HNoMS Andenes and Eglantine), take several German & Norwegian Quisling prisoners and destroy a radio transmitter at Glåpen. British destroyer HMS Bedouin shells a radio transmitter at Flakstadøya. In Vestfjord, British cruiser HMS Arethusa and destroyers HMS Somali, Ashanti, and Eskimo capture 2 Norwegian coastal steamers and sink a German patrol boat (after capturing the Enigma machine and code settings).

Before that - Jan 1st, 1942 12.30 hrs Prins Albert anchored at Scapa Flow, 7th Personnel from PA go on leave, retuning 20th , 26th No 12 Commando embarked Ayr, disembarked Dunoon 12.30 hrs

in April two troops of No.4 Commando and eight officers and 43 other ranks of the Carleton and York Regiment (Canadian 1st Division) took part in Abercrombie, a raid on Hardelot, France, near Boulogne. The LCA of HMS Prins Albert transported the party. This raid also marked the first operational use of the new LCS.[ The raid set out on the night of 19 April with the LCA being towed by Motor Gun Boats (MGBs). The procedure was for the party to travel to within two miles of the French coast on the MGBs and then to transfer to the LCA for the landing. Due to high seas and strong winds, which swamped and sank LCA 211, the raid was stopped with the loss of two naval ratings. The raid was remounted two nights later in calmer seas, but the period of optimum tide, moon, and darkness had past. The raid became uncoordinated, and whilst the Commandos got ashore and began their mission, the boats with the regular infantry became lost. Soon a German E-Boat was engaged by the MGBs. The army officers in the LCA conferred and decided not to disembark. Aboard the LCS, the senior naval officer?s compass failed, and the flotilla only returned to England steered by Lt. Groom?s army compass.

  CHANGED SPELLING  from HMS PRINCE ALBERT TO CORRECT SPELLING  HMS PRINS ALBERT

Abercrombie, a raid on Hardelot, France

April two troops of No.4 Commando and eight officers and 43 other ranks of the Carleton and York Regiment (Canadian 1st Division) took part in Abercrombie, a raid on Hardelot, France, near Boulogne. The LCA of HMS Prins Albert transported the party. This raid also marked the first operational use of the new LCS. The raid set out on the night of 19 April with the LCA being towed by Motor Gun Boats (MGBs). The procedure was for the party to travel to within two miles of the French coast on the MGBs and then to transfer to the LCA for the landing. Due to high seas and strong winds, which swamped and sank LCA 211, the raid was stopped with the loss of two naval ratings. The raid was remounted two nights later in calmer seas, but the period of optimum tide, moon, and darkness had past. The raid became uncoordinated, and whilst the Commandos got ashore and began their mission, the boats with the regular infantry became lost. Soon a German E-Boat was engaged by the MGBs. The army officers in the LCA conferred and decided not to disembark. Aboard the LCS, the senior naval officer’s compass failed, and the flotilla only returned to England steered by Lt. Groom’s army compass.


 

BRUNEVAL RAID  27/FEB/1942

                         

                                

        THE PRINS WAS USED FOR THE TRAINING OF THE COMMANDOS AND PARAS  ON         

   LOCH FYNE SCOTLAND  EMBARKING AND DISEMBARKING  FROM LANDING CRAFT 

  Commander F. N. Cook of the Royal Australian Navy who would be commanding the naval force intended to evacuate the company at the completion of the raid, as well as to the party of thirty-two officers and men from the Royal Fusiliers and South Wales Borderers who would remain in the landing craft and cover the company as it withdrew from the beach.  on the withdrawal
Major Frost was against firing his pistol to attract the landing craft in case
this simply served to alert more of the enemy in the area. However, he quickly decided that there was no other option and fired his pistol into the air. The landing craft responded to the shot and we were picked up.  we set sail for Gosport where the injured were transferred to hospital whilst the rest of the Company sailed on to Portsmouth. At Portsmouth we embarked the Prins Albert and were greeted by
Admiral Lord Mountbatten. a section from 181 airlanding field ambulance RAMC provided medical cover Lieut/baker and 20 men made part of the way on the PRINS ALBERT before transferring to  ALC's LCS's and a M.G.B,

  top two photos possably the Bruneval raid .or Dieppe

    DIEPPE  19/AUG/ 1942

                           HMS CALPE  HQ ship Dieppe

                                                         

Prins Albert carried  British No. 4 Commando (Lt Col  Lord  Lovat    only group who had any real success   

other landing ships
  HMS Glengyle (LSI Large); HMS Queen Emma (LSI Medium); HMS Princess Beatrix (LSI Medium); HMS Prince Charles (LSI Small); HMS Prins Albert (LSI Small); HMS Prince Leopold (LSI Small); HMS Princess Astrid (LSI Small); HMS Invicta (LSI Small); and HMS Duke of Wellington (LSI Small). 
         western flank     the PRINS ALBERT'S Landing Craft,
 carrying No. 4 Commando, were successfully landed according to plan. This part of the operation, which was under the joint command
of Lieut.-Commander H. H. H. Mulleneux,R.N., and Lieut.-Colonel the Lord Lovat,
M.C., M.P., went through without a hitch from beginning to end. The troops were very fortunate that they blew up an ammunition dump at their objective by a chance mortar hit early n their attack. They were subsequently withdrawn at approximately 0815 and returned to England without incident.       

        

                                       OPERATION TOUCH  NORTH AFRICA  8th NOV 1942

                                                           

PRINS ALBERT MADE  LANDINGS AT BIZERTA IN TUNISIA    

      The invasion of North Africa, in what was named "Operation Torch," was designed to encircle German troops stationed there. American troops went ashore in French North Africa with limited opposition. Soon after the landings, French troops defected to the American side. American and British troops advanced towards Tunisia, where they met  stiff German opposition       

                                                                            HMT DUNERA 
                        The Allied invasion of Sicily, code-named Operation Husky    9th/10th JULY 1943                                                                       

                                

   

                 

        
No. 3 Commando, half of them on board H.M. Transport "Dunera," a famous ship belonging to the British India Steam Navigation Company, and the other half on H.M.S. "Prins Albert", one of the staunchest of the landing ships, were steaming through the Suez Canal. june 1943.

 STORY SUBMITTED  ON  BEHALF OF LESLIE HARRIS  others in story GEORGE SIMS   I  have added one or two bits of information and corrected the spelling   to  PRINS ALBERT

,http://www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar/stories/14/a4681514.shtml

 left England on June 5th 1943 on the Prins Albert from Falmouth to go to the Mediterranean, the ship was loaded with too much weight and three to four days out in the middle of the Bay of Biscay the steel plates of the ship, which were made up of less than an half inch of steel, started splitting, instead of riding the waves the ship was bashing through the rough seas, the RAF personnel we were carrying out to the Med were handling buckets of water right through the ship, quite a few were seasick. We had to return to Falmouth for another week, we then set sail again, through
the Med, down to the Suez Canal and anchored off Port Tufik for three weeks while the rest of the ships got together for the invasion of Sicily, no leave was allowed. The Prins Albert landed number three commando in Avola Bay in Sicily, the first
wave of boats landed and came back for the second wave, as the boats went in they saw objects in the sea, for which they could not stop, on the way back after the Landing they picked up fifteen Glider Soldiers, these fellows were in the sea but they did not call for help on our way out because they knew we had a job to do, but waited for our return.
The Prins Albert was made  into the Area Headquarter Ship, we were machine gunned, morning and evening every day for three weeks or more. We all took turns to go out on Landing Craft to lay the smoke canisters, that hid the ships, going out on one occasion, George sat on the back between two smoke canisters, amongst all the noise, guns blazing, tracing fire lighting up the sky, and said 'Les I would not have missed this for the world'. One after another American Liberty Ships were being sunk each time being hit in the same place, just in front of the Bridge. We picked up survivors and took them to the Hospital Ship, these Merchant Seaman were in a dreadful state covered in oil and burnt. We landed the Commandos, after three days fighting, they came back on board for two days, we then set sail. The Battle had been held up at Catina, it was then decided to use the commandos to go behind enemy lines, we then set sail with a destroyer. 3 Commando were put ashore north of Augusta in the Bay of Agnone  to capture the bridge at malati  over the river Leonardo.The Destroyer fired before the first wave of Commandos went in, once that wave was landed the eight boats came back for the second wave. The Destroyer fired again, the Jerry knew we were coming then. The Enemy guns were positioned on the cliff tops and directed onto the shoreline, a few Commandos were killed before they even left the boats, the Flotilla Officer was badly wounded and later died of his wounds.
I was on Radio Watch at the time, boats were calling for help but we were not
allowed to answer, meanwhile the First Lieutenant of the Ship saw a torpedo go past the Bows from an Italian E Boat, we could not stay and pick our boats up. It was not safe, we needed to make ourselves scarce for fear of being hit. We circled around the Ocean and picked the boats up at first light, there were body bags in the passage way for the next few days, we then returned to our duty of being Headquarter Ship.

© Copyright of content contributed to this Archive rests with the author.

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar/stories/14/a4681514.shtml

 Punta dei Malati - 3 Commando Bridge. July 14th/15th 1943.
In WW2, bridges played an important part :- Kwai, Remagen, Toko Ri, Pegasus, Primasole etc.

This is the story of one that has been forgotten.
Three kilometres north of Lentini near to the city of Syracuse on the island of Sicily, lies the Malati Bridge. Today it is now on a minor road, overshadowed by an autostrada on massive concrete piles. This was not so in 1943.
The Casablanca Conference in January 1943 attended by Churchill, Roosevelt and their military and civil advisers, decided that on victory in North Africa the next step in the war against the Axis forces would be the invasion and reduction of the island of Sicily. The ?return to Europe?. Timed to take place in mid 1943 and code-named ?Husky? the D-Day for this operation would be the 10th of July 43. The British and Commonwealth 8th Army and the US 7th Army, along with allied naval and air arms would make up the invading forces, landing by sea and air.
The invasion of Sicily, a massive undertaking, was initially a sad tale of bad luck, poor planning and a large loss of allied troops to friendly-fire. Witness the Military Cemeteries at Catania, Syracuse and Agira and the numbers of those with ?no known grave? commemorated on panels at the Cassino Military Cemetery. But with dogged determination both armies secured their landings and the Axis forces were engaged..
By the 13th of July the 8th Army under the command of General Montgomery was established ashore and moving north. The intention was to push the Axis towards Messina cornering them in the north east of Sicily. The officer commanding No 3 Commando, Lt.Col. J.F.Durnford-Slater was summoned to the quay at Syracuse and given orders by General Dempsey to capture the Malati Bridge over the river Leonardo. Montgomery had realised that this bridge was on the main route north to Catania and wanted it intact and in Allied hands to ensure that the 50th Division could continue its advance.
3 Commando were put ashore north of Augusta in the Bay of Agnone from the infantry assault ship HMS Prince Albert and following the railway line, headed west towards Lentini. It had been thought that the only resistance would be from scattered Italian defenders, but straight away the commandos ran into the 3rd Battalion of the Hermann Goering Regiment. This meant that all the way to the bridge there was intensive fighting, but their objective was reached by 0300 on the 14th July.
The Italians guarding the bridge were quickly overcome and it came under British control. The demolition charges were removed and the commandos now had the task of holding the bridge until the arrival of the 50th Division which was fighting its way up Highway 114. This was the route north for the 8th Army and south for the re-supply of the German forces and their principal evacuation route north, so the Malati Bridge became the focus of numerous firefights. A German Mk VI Tiger tank appeared not more than 200 yards away and began firing its heavy machine gun towards the commandos who were around and under the bridge with no cover. A number of men were wounded and some, including Lt. Tony Butler who had joined No 3 (Army) Commando from the North Irish Horse Tank Regiment, were killed. More tanks could be heard coming down the road and with the 50th Division still not in sight, after a short discussion it was decided that the remaining commandos would withdraw into the hills to the east and reform. Once there they came under heavy fire again and they were ordered to set off in small parties to make for a prearranged rendezvous on the coast. With great difficulty most reached this objective, although some were captured (only to escape their captors shortly afterwards) and the majority of the survivors after a few square meals and a couple of nights? rest began to look forward to the next battle. Lt. Butler and Lt. Cave along with four other commando dead, were buried at the bridge. The other dead and wounded were recovered from the surrounding area, the total of casualties from the action being 153 killed, wounded and missing. This figure might have made the operation seem like a failure, but the fact that the bridge was not blown and the confusion caused the Axis forces by 3 Commando meant that the 50th Division could continue it?s advance north.
After the fall of Catania, General Montgomery ordered that a stone be carved with ?3 Commando Bridge? and this stone cemented into the Punta dei Malati bridge.
May 2005.
One reason for my latest trip to Sicily was to visit the Malati Bridge, which with the help of the Lentini stationmaster and a private motorist, plus a few Euros I managed to do.
The bridge today looks exactly as it did in a 1943 photograph, Montys stone still in place and the large pill box guarding one end. Standing under the bridge (as Lt. Butler and his comrades had done), on this hot, sunny, quiet afternoon it was hard to imagine those July days 62 years ago.
Lt. Butler and Lt. Cave are buried side by side in Catania Commonwealth Military Cemetery. Other officers and men of 3 Commando are buried in Syracuse Commonwealth Military Cemetery. They and those of 3 Commando (Army) who survived will not be forgotten. by Colin Hotham - WW2 PEOPLES WAR Site Helper,
.

                       WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

  AVOLA    SICILY
H.M.S.TETCOTT       ESCORT DESTROYER CATANIA

http://www.hmstetcott.com/

                                    

                    she helped the PRINS ALBERT  that day at CATANIA 14 JULY 1943

small photo left care of the imperial war museum,   Operation Husky: The Sicily Landings 9-10 July 1943: The Hunt Class destroyer HMS TETCOTT and the bow gun of SS ULSTER MONARCH, Commando landing ship, engaging shore batteries and machine gun posts inside the harbour at Augusta, while Commando Troops make for the shore in their landing craft.



HMS TETCOTT - OFFICIAL REPORT ON OPERATION HUSKY

WEDNESDAY 14 JULY 1943

At 00:37 I went in with the second wave and at 01:09 opened fire on the same target when I was three miles from the shore with better results than the first shoot. All enemy guns stopped firing almost at once and did not open fire again while I was bombarding. The Flotilla Officer of Prinz Albert's assault craft told me later that I scored more than one hit on a pill box and also set some kind of store containing fuel on fire, which were seen as two vivid flashes followed by a fire.

One of the reasons why I consider these two bombardments to have achieved success was the use of flashless cordite since the enemy; Germans in this case, seemed mystified as to my position.

My second bombardment was sharply interrupted at 01:21 by two or three E-boats attacking Prins Albert. I waited about ten seconds to fire a parting six-gun broadside and then raced after the E-boats. By sheer good luck I made a perfect interception and within two minutes was engaging the rear one with every gun that could bear. The chase was short and exciting, as within a few minutes, at 01:27, a large flash appeared on the target, the radar - Type 285 - which had been working very well indeed, lost echo and the E-boat stopped firing at me. On this evidence, coupled with an oil patch and burning wreckage which passed down my port side shortly after, I am certain that this E-boat was blown to bits by a direct hit by a 4-inch shell. I continued the chase for another four or five minutes after the other E-boats, but they were not prepared to face the music, withdrawing at full speed to the northward. I then returned to Prins Albert who closed and hoisted her assault craft.

Both ships then returned and entered Syracuse soon after dawn. As there was no other ship present with a good long range H/A armament, I assumed the duty A/A Guard Ship, Syracuse, until 10:30 when Carlisle arrived. With her arrival I went to a lower state of readiness than second-degree for the first time since 01:00 on 10 July. 


Richard Rycroft

Lieutenant Commander in Command
19 July 1943


PHOTO TAKEN FROM THE HMS PRINS ALBERT  note, this merchant ship is at anchor

                                       

                                                                                

                                                      The Allied Invasion of Italy. work in progress 

                                                

                                                                                                hms Blackmore           

September 9th 1943 Salerno
The two commando units were embarked on Prins Albert and 3 other British LSI?s. the hms Blackmore began the shell barrage on the coastal battery at Vietri.  The commandos secured the deserted beach, and the coastal battery surrendered without much of a fight. The commando force was made up of No.2 Army Commandos (Churchill), 41 Commandos Royal Marine (Lt. Col Bertie Lumsden) they were commanded overall by Brigadier Bob Laycock

 

                    D.DAY 6th JUNE 1944

The Princess Margaret was built in 1931 by Wm. Denny of Dumbarton for the LMS (London, Midland & Scottish Railway) route from Stranraer to Larne. She was 325ft long, 2838 gross tons, and carried 1250 passengers, with 107 first class berths, and 54 second. Her speed was 20.5 knots. She also ran some coastal cruises and trips to Bangor from Larne. In 1939, on the appearance of the new Princess Victoria, she was transferred to the Heysham-Belfast route, returning to Stranraer when the new ship was requisitioned for war service. Sailed with the HMS PRINS ALBERT 

                                    

 Photo courtesy of Keith Taylor who adds "Phiippe Balduin sent me this. It was the White Ensign which flew on the landing craft of the 46 RMC on the 7th of June. It belonged to the Cox David Gardner who later gave it to Philippe's son." Keith's father Eric Taylor served with 46RM Commando.


Month and year : June 1946 marine commando.

Commanding Officer : Lt-Col C.R. Hardy, R.M.

1st June 1944 Place: Shanklin
P.M. - Assault unit (less Admn Section) left SHANKLIN by rail and embarked at EGYPT POINT, COWES, in LSsI H.M.S. PRINS ALBERT and SS Princess Margaret with full equipment for alternative operations - DEER (HOULGATE C.D. Bty) or FROG (BENERVILLE C.D. Bty) which were to be carried out on the night of D/D + 1.

 6th June 1944 Place: Cowes Roads 1230 - LSsI sailed in company with H.M.S. ISIS (Destroyer escort).
1830 - Arrived at anchorage JUNO (off ST. AUBIN-SUR-MER) proceeding one hour later to anchorage SWORD (off OUISTREHAM) to report to Flag Officer, Force S.
2200 - The order was received that both operations were postponed as neither of the Btys was harassing our shipping and also because the weather was not altogether favourable for the operations.  The LSsI returned to anchorage JUNO for the night.

7th June 1944- 0600 - Signal received that the unit was to come under command 1 Corp and to be landed on NAN WHITE Beach as early as possible.  Hasty re-adjustments and improvisations were made to equipment.
Place: Hernieres 002853
0900 - The unit was landed by the ships flotillas on NAN WHITE Beach.  Orders were received that the unit was to capture strong-point PETIT ENFER area 048833 - 052830 - 051829 - 047832 with u/c one troop RMAS Gp.

 46th commando unit was divided so for the landing:
Troops z, s  and h were aboard Princess Margaret and x,y,a and b were on the Prins Albert.

                                                                                        HMS Issi  escort on crossing,     20th  June Sunk whilst on patrol off Normandy..

Admiralty correspondence in July 1944 records ship was not at anchor. loss was likely to have been due to a mine or torpedo.    

                                                                                                                                                    Commandos memorial    

  No. 48 (Royal Marine) Commando was the last commando unit formed during the Second World War in March 1944. It was formed by the conversion of the 7th Royal Marine Battalion and the Mobile Naval Base Defence Organisations defence battalions to commando duties. Under the command of Lieutenant Colonel James Moulton it carried out a shortened commando course at Achnacarry and then joined the all Royal Marine 4th Special Service Brigade alongside No. 41, No. 46 and No. 47 (Royal Marine) Commandos                          

   5 JULY,      FIRST AMERICAN'S ON BOARD 404 fighter group

The officers were welcomed aboard
by the Captain who stated that this was the first time that American troops had ever been on board the Prins Albert and that he hoped it would not be the last. The officers were then shown to the officer?s lounge where drinks were served

At 0300 on the morning of 6th July or D plus 30, the rear echelon of the 404th Fighter Group sailed for the Omaha

The "HMS Prins Albert" arrived off the Omaha beachead just north of the St Laurent Sur Mer, and dropped anchor at approximately 1300.

THE PRINS made  about 8 crossing with the American forces 

             Operation Dragoon, 15 aug 1944  southern France

                                                              

                                                                       HMCS PRINCE DAVID                        

      Operation Romeo was a French commando operation to disable German artillery atop the cliffs of Cap Nègre. The operation happened the evening before Operation Dragoon, the main invasion of Southern France. The force consisted of 800 French commandos of the 1er Commando Français de l'Afrique du Nord, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Georges-Régis Bouvet. The attacking flotilla included the command ship HMCS Prince David, HMCS Prince Henry, HMS Princess Beatrix, HMS Prins Albert and 4 U.S. motor torpedo boats.At 0130 15 August, 95 commandos in landing craft from Prince David beached first, while the remainder of the force waited off shore. The commandos had to climb a 350 feet (107 m) tall cliff to reach their objective. Half an hour later they sent word back that the enemy gun positions had been silenced. The main body of Romeo then came into beach. About 700 commandos then moved quickly and soon were established across the main road between Toulon and the Riviera. 300 German soldiers were killed and 700 were taken prisoner. The French commandos suffered 11 men killed and 50 wounded. The force held its position until relieved by VI Corps from the east on August 15 1944      

 Task Force 86 SITKA FORCE
Rear Admiral Lyal A. Davidson

GUNFIRE SUPPORT GROUP
Rear Admiral Davidson
French battleship Lorraine
Heavy cruiser USS Augusta (flagship)
Light cruiser HMS Dido
Destroyers USS Somers, USS Gleaves, HMS Lookout, HHMS Themistoklis
Reserve: Light cruisers USS Omaha, USS Cincinnati, HMS Sirius

TRANSPORT GROUP
Rear Admiral Theodore E. Chandler
Unit A: Destroyer transports USS Tattnall, HMS Prince Baudoin; PT-201
Unit B: HMCS Prince Henry; Destroyer transports USS Barry, USS Greene, USS Roper, USS Osmond Ingram, four PT boats
ROMEO Unit: HMCS Prince David, HMS Prins Albert, HMS Princess Beatrix, four PT boats
Screen: Eight PT boats

MINESWEEPER GROUP
HMS Larne, Clinton, Octavia, Stormcloud, Welfare, four minelayers, Danlayer HMS Kintyre

Rear Admiral Lyal A. Davidson

GUNFIRE SUPPORT GROUP
Rear Admiral Davidson
French battleship Lorraine
Heavy cruiser USS Augusta (flagship)
Light cruiser HMS Dido
Destroyers USS Somers, USS Gleaves, HMS Lookout, HHMS Themistoklis
Reserve: Light cruisers USS Omaha, USS Cincinnati, HMS Sirius

TRANSPORT GROUP
Rear Admiral Theodore E. Chandler
Unit A: Destroyer transports USS Tattnall, HMS Prince Baudoin; PT-201
Unit B: HMCS Prince Henry; Destroyer transports USS Barry, USS Greene, USS Roper, USS Osmond Ingram, four PT boats
ROMEO Unit: HMCS Prince David, HMS Prins Albert, HMS Princess Beatrix, four PT boats
Screen: Eight PT boats

MINESWEEPER GROUP
HMS Larne, Clinton, Octavia, Stormcloud, Welfare, four minelayers, Danlayer HMS Kintyre

                

                                                                     OPERATION DRACULA

                                                                          landing craft from the PRINS ALBERT

                                                                      Operation Dracula  1 May 1945

                                   

                                  

Operation Dracula struck on 1 May 1945. 12 squadrons of B-24 bombers bombed defenses south of Rangoon, while air transports dropped a Gurkha parachute battalion at Elephant Point at the mouth of the Rangoon River. On 2 May, the amphibious operations began, but when Allied troops reached the city, they found Rangoon already abandoned. The Indian 26th Division began the operation to secure the city on 3 May, which was closer to being police action than the conquest of a city; with the Japanese suddenly gone, Rangoon fell victim to widespread looting. On 6 May, elements of the Indian 26th Division met the advance troops of the Indian 17th Division from Pegu at Hlegu, which signified the end of the battle of Rangoon.

 

 

 CREW RATINGS

 CREW RATINGS HMS PRINS ALBERT  ANYONE WISHING TO ADD A NAME ,  FORWARD IT TO ME BY THE GUESTBOOK  EMAIL ADDRESS WILL BE REMOVED IF REQUESTED

 http://www.unithistories.com/units_british/hms/Prins%20Albert.htm

 link for, officers list.

KENNETH HARRY AMESS  TEL/GRAF He was recommended to the captain on his first night on board as he spotted a fire nearby to the telegraphists room and it took awhile to put out, but he still stayed at his post and was only 17  coming up 18 years old.      Another interesting fact is that when the Japanese surrendered at the end of the war one of the head men of a nearby small island had to hand over their sword to the captain who put it up for a raffle prize draw which Kenneth won.

 B BAUN  OS                     BIRMINGHAM                                       

C J BELL  SHIPS JOINER      OAKHAM RUTLAND                                

L R BEECH P.O.                       GLASGOW                                   

ROBERT BULL P.O.      died 14/June 2013                                 

CHARLIE BATTON SBA          PORTSMOUTH                                     

K J DEARSON P.O. TEL/GRAF   SOUTHPORT                                

 DAVID GARDNER      COXSWAIN                                                     

 MATTHEW JAMES GRIMES   ELC/ENGINEER   LIVERPOOL               

NOBBY HALL                                                                             

LESLIE HARRIS                                                                               

JOHN (JACK) HOUGH                                                                       

W E HARPER SBA                    READING                                         

ALFRED L LAPPIN  stoker       SWINDON                                       

T W PATTERSON LS                 SUNDERLAND                                   

F ROBBINS  AB                        PORTSMOUTH                                   

WILLIAM F RODAWAY Seaman  LIVERPOOL                                  

 R STANDING    L/TELEGRAPH   WORTHING                                     

R STEWART P.O.                       GLASGOW                                 

ALBERT TIMMS  AB                   NEWBURY                                      

 H WEIR  AB                              BELFAST                                          

L F WHATTON                                                                               

BILL (TUG) WILSON                                                                         

RICHARD G WIDDLECOMBE  AB

 

 

  
 

              crew men lost,

                       CATANIA WAR CEMETERY SICILY

                                 

                     

the Prins  lost two men during the war but not to the enemy

        ALFRED L LAPPIN  STOKER 1C  D/KX 145106

    ACCIDENT 11/9/1943  AGE 20 GRAVE REF/11.F.23

 SON OF ALFRED HENRY AND LILY LAPPIN, OF SWINTON, LANCASHIRE.

              CATANIA WAR CEMETERY SICILY.

 

         RICHARD G WIDDICOMBE AB D/JX 208329

      MPK 19/4/1942  AGE 20  PANAL 67 COLUMN 1

              PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL

                                                     Richard was reported lost overboard  returning to ship from shore ?                                                        son of Richard Widdicombe, and Emily Widdlcombe, of Keyham Devonport 

 .

           THE  ONLY RODAWAY'S   LOST WW2

    this line is also related ,

Of the many civilians of the Commonwealth whose deaths were due to enemy action in the 1939-1945 War, the names of some 67,092 are commemorated in the Civilian War Dead Roll of Honour, located near St. George's Chapel in Westminster Abbey, London

 



William Ernest Rodaway        Age:14  Civilian Date of Death: 17/09/1940
                                                                          
Reporting Authority
ISLINGTON, METROPOLITAN BOROUGH

of 23 Halton Mansions, Canonbury Road. Son of William and Gertrude Rodaway. Injured at Halton Mansions; died same day at Royal Northern Hospital


PARENTS, WILLIAM LAWRENCE RODAWAY 1896  

GERTRUDE  SHARMAN  1897               

Joan I  RODAWAY    1917       sister    

Eileen S M RODAWAY 1928       sister




William Rodaway Head 27 abt 1844    St Luke
Emily Rodaway Wife 27 abt 1844 St Luke
Henrietta Rodaway 5 abt 1866 St Luke
William Rodaway                  2 abt 1869 St LukeNora Kathleen Rodaway
William  J Rodaway Head 32 abt 1869 Islington London England
Francis Rodaway Wife 29 abt 1872 Islington London England
Rose Rodaway Daughter 18 abt 1883 Highbury London England
William Rodaway Son 5 abt 1896 Highbury Londo

  work in progress