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                                        KINGS LIVERPOOL  REGIMENT VC's  work in progress.

 Nine Victoria Crosses were awarded to the regiment, the first in 1900 and the last in 1918. An additional two were awarded to Royal Army Medical Corps officer Noel Godfrey Chavasse, who was attached to the Liverpool Scottish during the First World War
 
                                                                         
 
SERGEANT HARRY HAMPTON VCSERGEANT HARRY HAMPTON VCSERGEANT HARRY HAMPTON VC

2nd Battalion, SERGEANT HARRY HAMPTON VC

2nd Battalion, SERGEANT HARRY HAMPTON VC

                                                PTE HENRY JAMES KNIGHT VC  1st BATTALION                                                                                                          

 

  (Corporal)  1st Battalion The Kings Liverpool Regiment; No. I Company 4th Division Mounted Infantry              

On august 21st 1900, during operations near Van Wyk?s Vlei, Corporal Knight and four men were occupying a position behind some rocks, to cover the rear for a detachment of their company, which, under Captain Ewart, D.S.O., was holding the right of the line.  Being attacked on the right by about fifty Boers, Knight?s little band of four men was almost surrounded at very close quarters by the enemy.  Ordering them to retire one by one to a more sheltered position, he stayed at his post for nearly an hour, covering Captain Ewart?s force, during which two of his men were shot.  Placing one of them in a secure place he left him there, carrying the other for two miles on his back, the whole time being under a very hot fire from the enemy. and later achieved the rank of Captain

 Medal entitlement of:
Captain Henry James KNIGHT
1st Bn, King's ( Liverpool ) Regiment
Victoria Cross
Queen's South Africa Medal ( 1899-1902 )
4 clasps:
"Defence of Ladysmith" - "Orange Free State""Laing's Nek" - "Belfast"
King's South Africa Medal ( 1901-02 )
2 clasps:
"South Africa 1901" - "South Africa 1902"
British War Medal ( 1914-20 ) Victory Medal ( 1914-19 )
King George VI Coronation Medal ( 1937 )
Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal ( 1953 )
Army Long Service & Good Conduct Medal
Engraving on reverse of Victoria Cross:
CORPORAL H.J. KNIGHT 1ST BN. LIVERPOOL REGT.
21ST AUGT 1900

 

Captain Henry James KNIGHT
1st Bn, King's ( Liverpool ) Regiment
Victoria Cross
Queen's South Africa Medal ( 1899-1902 )
4 clasps:
"Defence of Ladysmith" - "Orange Free State"
"Laing's Nek" - "Belfast"
King's South Africa Medal ( 1901-02 )
2 clasps:
"South Africa 1901" - "South Africa 1902"
British War Medal ( 1914-20 )
Victory Medal ( 1914-19 )
King George VI Coronation Medal ( 1937 )
Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal ( 1953 )
Army Long Service & Good Conduct Medal
Engraving on reverse of Victoria Cross:

CORPORAL H.J. KNIGHT
1ST BN. LIVERPOOL REGT.
21ST AUGT 1900

   SERGEANT HARRY HAMPTON VC   2nd Battalion

 VC., Medal's Custodian is in the King's Regiment Collection. (Museum of Liverpool Life)

                     Born on 14th December 1870 at Richmond, Surrey.

                        Died on 4th February, 1920 at Richmond, Surrey.

   Memorial on Richmond Cemetery Old Burial Ground. Grave number 62, Section X.

 London Gazetted on 18th October, 1901.

 Digest of Citation reads:   

On 21st August, 1900 at Van Wyk's Vlei, South Africa, Sergeant Hampton, who was in command of a small party of Mounted Infantry, held an important position for some time against heavy odds, and when compelled to retire saw all his men into safety and then, although he himself had been wounded in the head, supported a lance-corporal who was unable to walk until the latter was hit again and apparently killed. Sergeant Hampton received another wound some time later.  He became Colour-Sergeant, was Sergeant Instructor in Musketry, and was discharged on pension. His was one of three VC's won by his regiment in as many days.

 Medal entitlement of:
Colour Sergeant Harry HAMPTON
2nd Bn, King's ( Liverpool ) Regiment
Victoria Cross
Queen's South Africa Medal ( 1899-1902 )
4 clasps:
"Defence of Ladysmith" - "Orange Free State" "Transvaal" - "Laing's Nek"

                                                                      

 

SERGEANT HARRY HAMPTON VC

2nd Battalion, King's (Liverpool) Regiment.

London Gazetted on 18th October, 1901.

VC., Medal's Custodian is in the King's Regiment Collection. (Museum of Liverpool Life)

Born on 14th December 1870 at Richmond, Surrey.

Died on 4th February, 1920 at Richmond, Surrey.

Memorial on Richmond Cemetery Old Burial Ground. Grave number 62, Section X.

Digest of Citation reads:   

On 21st August, 1900 at Van Wyk's Vlei, South Africa, Sergeant Hampton, who was in command of a small party of Mounted Infantry, held an important position for some time against heavy odds, and when compelled to retire saw all his men into safety and then, although he himself had been wounded in the head, supported a lance-corporal who was unable to walk until the latter was hit again and apparently killed. Sergeant Hampton received another wound some time later.  He became Colour-Sergeant, was Sergeant Instructor in Musketry, and was discharged on pension. His was one of three VC's won by his regiment in as many days.

 SERGEANT HARRY HAMPTON VC

2nd Battalion, SERGEANT HARRY HAMPTON VC

2nd Battalion, 

                                          

the date on this headstone was incorrect  he  Died: Twickenham, 2 November 1922 this was corrected.

 

                                      PRIVATE WILLIAM EDWARD HEATON VC 1st Battalion

                                Born on in 1875 at Ormskirk, Lancashire. 

                         Died on 5th June 1941 at Southport in Lancashire.

 V.C., Medal's Custodian in the King's Regiment Collection. (Museum of Liverpool Life)



Died on 5th June 1941 at Southport in Lancashire. 
London Gazette on 18th January 1901.
 Citation reads: 

On 23rd August 1900 at Geluk, South Africa, a company of the 1st Battalion, King's (Liverpool) Regiment became surrounded by the enemy and was suffering severely. Private Heaton volunteered to take a message back to explain the position of the company and he carried out this mission successfully at imminent risk to his own life. Had it not been for his courage, the remainder of his company would almost certainly have had to surrender.
 On 23rd August 1900 at Geluk, South Africa, a company of the 1st Battalion, King's (Liverpool) Regiment became surrounded by the enemy and was suffering severely. Private Heaton volunteered to take a message back to explain the position of the company and he carried out this mission successfully at imminent risk to his own life. Had it not been for his courage, the remainder of his company would almost certainly have had to surrender.
 Sergeant William Edward HEATON
1st Bn, King's ( Liverpool ) Regiment
Victoria Cross
Queen's South Africa Medal ( 1899-1902 )
3 clasps:
"Defence of Ladysmith""Laing's Nek" - "Belfast"
King's South Africa Medal ( 1901-02 )
2 clasps:
"South Africa 1901" - "South Africa 1902"
1914 - 15 Star British War Medal ( 1914-20 ) Victory Medal ( 1914-19 )
King George VI Coronation Medal ( 1937 )
Engraving on reverse of Victoria Cross:
PRIVATE W. HEATON
1ST BN. LIVERPOOL REGT. 23RD AUGT 1900
                                                                    
                                                           
 
 
 
 
                                                                L/CPL,JOSEPH H TOMPS
 
                                    1st Battalion. King's (Liverpool) Regiment.
                                 Born in 1884 at Melbourne, Victoria , Australia.
                                     Died on 28th June 1966 at Toronto, Canada.
                         Memorial on grave at Pine Hill Cemetery, Toronto, Canada.
 
 VC Medal's Custodian is RHQ of the King's Regiment, Bury, Lancashire.
 
 
VC Medal's Custodian is RHQ of the King's Regiment, Bury, Lancashire.
 
 
Died on 28th June 1966 at Toronto, Canada.
 
Memorial on grave at Pine Hill Cemetery, Toronto, Canada.
 London Gazetted on 24th July 1915.
 Digest of Citation reads: 
 
 Lance-Corporal Tombs, on his own initiative, repeatedly made his way out under extremely heavy fire, from shell and machine-gun, in order to bring in some wounded men who were lying, approximately 100 yards, in front of our trenches. He managed to rescue four men, one of whom was so badly wounded that had he not received Medical attention, he surely would have died. Lance-Corporal Tombs dragged back by placing a rifle sling around the man's body and his own neck.  
Medal entitlement of:
Corporal Joseph Harcourt TOMBS
1st Bn, King's ( Liverpool ) Regiment
Victoria Cross
1914 - 15 Star British War Medal ( 1914-20 )
Mercantile Marine War Medal ( 1914-18 ) Victory Medal ( 1914-19 ) + MiD Oakleaf
King George VI Coronation Medal ( 1937 )
Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal ( 1953 )
Cross of St George ( 4th Class ) ( Russia )
 
                                                      
                                                 
 
 
 
                                        Second Lieutenant EDWARD FELIX BAXTER
 
                                           1st/8th Battalion the King's (Liverpool) Regiment.
 
 Born on 18th September 1885 at Old Swinford, Stourbridge, Worcestershire. 
 Killed in action on 18th April 1916 near Blairville, France.
 Memorial at Fillievres British Cemetery, France.
 
 VC Medal's Custodian is the Imperial War Museum.
 London Gazetted on 26th September 1916.
 Digest of Citation reads: 
 
 On 17th/18th April, 1916 near Blairville, France, prior to a raid, Second Lieutenant Baxter was engaged on cutting wire close to the enemy's trenches. While doing this, he held a bomb with the pin withdrawn and on one occasion the bomb slipped and fell. He picked it up, unscrewed the base plug and dug out the detonator which he smothered in the ground, preventing the alarm being given an saving many casualties. Later, leading a storming party, he was first into the trench. After assisting in bombing dug-outs, he finally climbed out, and assisted the last man over the parapet. After this he was not seen again, though search parties went out at once to look for him.   There seems no doubt that he lost his life in his great devotion to duty.
 Medal entitlement of:
Second Lieutenant Edward BAXTER
8th Bn, King's ( Liverpool ) Regiment
Victoria Cross
British War Medal ( 1914-20 )Victory Medal ( 1914-19 )
Engraving on reverse of Victoria Cross:
2ND. LT. E. F. BAXTER.
LATE 1 / 8TH. BN. L'POOL R. T.F.  17 - 18 APL.1916
 
                                                
                                              
                                             
 
                                                                           Liverpool Irish From Wikipedia
 Orders were received in early January that the Liverpool Irish and its brigade were to transfer to the 55th (West Lancashire) Division. Dismantled in the early stages of the war when its constituent battalions were deployed to overseas theatres, the 55th reformed at Hallencourt under command of Major-General Hugh Jeudwine. Specially-trained volunteers from the Liverpool Irish were selected to conduct the division's first major raid on German trenches, at Ransart on the night of 17 April. Split into two parties of wirecutters and raiders, the Liverpool Irish entered the trench system and proceeded to grenade three dug-outs and destroy a munitions store The raiders' sole fatality, Second-Lieutenant Edward Felix Baxter, was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.
                                           
                                                                                           the raiding party
 
 
                PTE,3156 ARTHUR HERBERT PROCTER 
                                                later The Reverend
 
                         1/5th Battalion The King's (Liverpool) Regiment.
                          Born on 11th August 1890 at Bootle, Lancashire.
 
                          Died on 27th January 1973 at Sheffield, Yorkshire.
 
    Memorial at Sheffield Cathedral.  Ashes in the Crypt Chapel, Sheffield Cathedral.
 London Gazetted on 5th August 1916
.Digest of Citation reads:
 
 On 4th June, 1916 near Ficheux, France, Private Procter noted some movement on the part of two wounded men who were lying in full view of the enemy about 75 yards in front of the trenches. He at once went out on his own initiative and although heavily fired at, ran and crawled to the two men, got them under cover of a small bank, dressed their wounds and promised that they would be rescued after dark. He left them some of his clothing for warmth and then returned to his own trenches, again being heavily fired at.   At dusk both wounded men were brought out alive
 
Additional information: 
He served as a Chaplain with the Royal Air Force during the Second World War having been ordained in 1927.  He fought on the Somme as well as Neuve Chapelle, Festubert, Givenchy and Arras.
 VC King's Regiment Museum, Liverpool
 Private Arthur Herbert PROCTER
5th Bn, King's ( Liverpool ) Regiment
Victoria Cross
1914 - 15 Star British War Medal ( 1914-20 ) Victory Medal ( 1914-19 )
Defence Medal ( 1939-45 ) War Medal ( 1939-45 )
King George VI Coronation Medal ( 1937 )
Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal ( 1953 )
Engraving on reverse of Victoria Cross:
NO. 3156 PTE. A.H. PROCTER 1/5 BN. LIVERPOOL REGT. T.F.
4 JUNE 1916
 
                                                                                                                                                                     
         
                                                               Sergeant 14951 DAVID JONES     
                                             12th Battalion. The King's (Liverpool) Regiment. 
 
                         Born on 10th January 1891 at Liverpool, Lancashire.
 
                   Killed in action on 7th October 1916 at Bancourt, Somme, France.
 
                               Memorial on grave at Bancourt Cemetery, France.
 
 
 London Gazetted on 26 October 19                                
  Digest of Citation reads:
 
                 On 3rd September 1916 at Guillemont, France, the platoon to which Sergeant Jones belonged was ordered to a forward position and during the advance came under heavy machine-gun fire, the officer being killed and the platoon suffering a great many casualties. The sergeant led forward of the survivors, occupied the position and held it for two days and two nights, without food or water, until relieved. On the second day he drove back three counter-attacks, inflicting heavy losses.
 Medal entitlement of:
Sergeant David JONES
12th Bn, King's ( Liverpool ) Regiment
Victoria Cross
1914 - 15 Star British War Medal ( 1914-20 ) Victory Medal ( 1914-19 )
Engraving on reverse of Victoria Cross:
NO. 14951 SERGT. D. JONES 12TH BN. LIVERPOOL R.
3 SEP 1916
 
 
                                                             
 
                                                     
 
 
                                                               Captain OSWALD AUSTIN REID
                (later Major) 1st Battalion King's Liverpool Regiment attached to the 
                                   6th Bn. The Royal North Lancashire Regiment 
 
 
                            Born on: 2nd November 1893 at Johannesburg, South Africa.
 
                            Died on: 27th October 1920 at Johannesburg, South Africa.
 
                                              Buried at Bloemfontein, S. Africa.
 
 London Gazetted on 8th June 1917.
 
 Digest of Citation reads:
On 8/10 March 1917 at Diala River, Mesopotamia, Captain Reid consolidated a small post with the advanced troops on the opposite side of the river to the main body, after his lines of communication had been cut by the sinking of the pontoons. He maintained this position for 30 hours against constant attacks by bombs, machine-guns and rifle fire, with the full knowledge that repeated attempts at relief had failed and that his ammunition was all but exhausted. It was greatly due to his tenacity that the crossing of the river was effected the next night. During the operation he was wounded.
Medal entitlement of:
Major Oswald Austin REID
1st Bn, King's ( Liverpool ) Regiment
att'd 6th Bn, The Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire)
Victoria Cross
1914 - 15 Star British War Medal ( 1914-20 ) Victory Medal ( 1914-19 )
Medal of Military Valour ( Italy )

 
                                                 
                                                           
                                 
 
 
                                                                   PTE 94087 JACK COUNTER, 
                                                                                
 
 
 Private. 1st Battalion, King?s (Liverpool) Regiment.
 London Gazetted upon 22nd May, 1918.
 Born on 3rd November, 1898 at Blandford Forum, Dorset
 Died on 16th September 1970 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
 is ashes are interred on Jersey, Channel Islands
 Named after him is the Jack Counter Close at St  Helier, Jersey.
 
 Digest of Citation reads: 
 On 16th April, 1918 near Boisieux St. Marc, France, it was necessary for information to be obtained from the front line and the only way to get it was over ground with no cover and in full view of the enemy. A small party tried without success, followed by six men, singly, each one being killed in the attempt. Private Counter then volunteered and, going out under terrific fire, got through and returned with vital information which enabled his commanding officer to organise and launch the final successful counter-attack. Subsequently he also carried five messages across the open under heavy artillery barrage to company headquarters.   His extraordinary courage in facing almost certain death produced a most excellent impression on his young and untried companions.
 Medal entitlement of:
Private Jack Thomas COUNTER
1st Bn, King's ( Liverpool ) Regiment
Victoria Cross
British War Medal ( 1914-20 ) Victory Medal ( 1914-19 )
King George VI Coronation Medal ( 1937 )
Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal ( 1953 )
Imperial Service Medal ( 1902
 
kindly sent in by Richard W ELLIS, great war forum.
 Winning the VC.
By April 1918 the German Spring Offensive had largely run its course. What followed, to use Douglas Haig's words, was  a period "active defence". In this phase, the British front line was to be  preserved unbroken, while any breaches made by the Germans were to be closed and filled. In the  sector occupied by the 1 King's (Liverpool) Regiment both British and German defences were incomplete. There were few communication trenches and sunken roads ran through both British and German lines. One, the lane running between Boisleux St. Marc and Boyelles, was the scene of Pte. Jack Counter's act of bravery on 16 April 1918.                                  
 
From 09.00 to 09.30 on 16 April 1918 the Germans put down a heavy barrage on the front line and reserve trenches near Boisleux St. Marc, a small village to the south of Arras.    Whizz-bangs, 4.2", 5.9" shells rained down on the British front line along with a bombardment of light and heavy trench mortars. It must have been a daunting baptism of fire for the many newly arrived young reinforcements who had just joined the battalion. In the bombardment there were heavy casualties, including the officers in charge of both front line companies. After the shelling had shifted to the reserve and support lines, the Germans attacked in force under the cover of the barrage using the Boisleux St.  Marc to Boyelles sunken road and the communication trenches leading to an unoccupied trench that ran parallel to the British front line. By 09.35 the Germans were in the British front line in four places and proceeded to bomb at once in overwhelming numbers making good progress. The British artillery put down an effective barrage at 09.30.  No.8 platoon of B company fought on despite being outflanked and with Germans to their front. At 09.30 No. 7 platoon of B company, which was in company reserve, was in the support trench at the top of the ridge 250 yards behind the front line.
By 10.00 the Germans were in about 400-500 yards of the front line from S12d 2 6 to S18a 9 6 approximately.
 
The British set up blocks in the trench at these points and started bombing. The right B company platoon counter attacked and succeeded in getting the Germans out of the front line apart from three fire bays, where they formed another trench block. The left company succeeded in gaining 200 yards of the British front line trench.

At 11.00 the Germans attacked again up the sunken lane towards the British picquet line but were driven off by Lewis Gun and rifle fire. By now the bombing party on the left commanded by 2 Lt.  H. Foster was very weak but 2 Lt.  R. T.  Symonds  arrived with 18 other ranks and the bombing continued. At 11.30 2 Lt. W. Wilson arrived with 25 other ranks from D company via the Boisleux St. Marc to Becquerelle road and relieved 2 Lt. Symonds.
 
At 11.30 the officer commanding B company  sent a message to the officer in charge of No. 7 platoon that at all costs he was to get in touch with No. 8 platoon to find out if they still held their ground either side of the sunken road. Six men and an NCO set out, but as soon as they appeared above the ridge line, they were fired on by German machine gunners; the NCO was killed and another man wounded. They could go no further. Following this abortive attempt, another five men tried to get through but were all killed by withering machine gun fire in full view of the men in the reserve trench. The only way of reaching the front line from the support was along the sunken road down a forward slope of about 250 yards "with no cover and in full view of the enemy, who was sweeping the whole area with violent machine gun fire".
 
At 13.30 the Germans made a third  determined attack and succeeded in driving the 2 Lt.  Wilson's group on the left bombing party back 200 yards. Wilson was wounded in the exchange.
 
At 14.00 Private Jack Counter, who was near his officer at the time and had seen the five men killed, volunteered to take the message to the front line.  He went down the lane which was being lashed by machine gun fire. Keeping close to the high bank and laying flat on his face, he made his way slowly down the road, crossing two wire entanglements which lay across it.  He had to negotiate 250 yards of open country on the forward slope in full view of the enemy. He returned the same way one hour later. His colonel used the information he brought back on the number of Germans in the British front line, the exact position of the flank and the remaining strength of our troops to launch the counter attack which drove the Germans back. In all he carried five messages to company HQ across open country and under a heavy barrage.
 
 
According to the war diary two platoons from C and A companies of the 1 King's (Liverpool) Regiment and one platoon of 2 South Staffs reinforced the front line at 14.30 and a counter attack was made.  At 15.15  reinforcements of 20 other ranks under Captains E. R. Mace and J.A.Armstrong arrived and the Germans retreated to their own lines. By18.30 the whole line had been recaptured. The Germans had mostly escaped down the sunken road and communication trenches. They left behind two machine guns and eight dead. Four wounded Germans were made prisoner.
 
One officer, 2nd Lt. Gordon Penry Williams, and 17 other ranks were killed; 4 more other ranks died of wounds;  61 were wounded; 20 were reported missing in action.  2nd Lt. Williams and 15 other King's (Liverpool) Regiment soldiers who died that day are buried in Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez.  They are all buried close to one another in plot VIII row P.
  After the war
In 1921 Jack was demobbed on Jersey as a corporal, becoming a postman, although he was unable to find a permanent position for nearly four years. He had to move from town to town in England  to find temporary work. He eventually found a permanent post office job on Jersey, where he married. However,he regularly visited his family; it was on one such visit that he died in Blandford in 1970. His VC is in the St. Helier  museum, Jersey, where he had spent most of his working life.   
sunken lane
                         
 
 
 
On 16th April, 1918 near Boisieux St. Marc, France, it was necessary for information to be obtained from the front line and the only way to get it was over ground with no cover and in full view of the enemy. A small party tried without success, followed by six men, singly, each one being killed in the attempt. Private Counter then volunteered and, going out under terrific fire, got through and returned with vital information which enabled his commanding officer to organise and launch the final successful counter-attack. Subsequently he also carried five messages across the open under heavy artillery barrage to company headquarters.   His extraordinary courage in facing almost certain death produced a most excellent impression on his young and untried companions.

 

 

London Gazetted upon 22nd May, 1918. 
Born on 3rd November, 1898 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
Died on 16th September 1970 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
His ashes are interred on Jersey, Channel Islands.
 
Named after him is the Jack Counter Close at St  Helier, Jersey.
London Gazetted upon 22nd May, 1918. 
Born on 3rd November, 1898 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
Died on 16th September 1970 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
His ashes are interred on Jersey, Channel Islands.
 
Named after him is the Jack Counter Close at St  Helier, Jersey.
London Gazetted upon 22nd May, 1918. 
Born on 3rd November, 1898 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
Died on 16th September 1970 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
His ashes are interred on Jersey, Channel Islands.
 
Named after him is the Jack Counter Close at St  Helier, Jersey.
London Gazetted upon 22nd May, 1918. 
Born on 3rd November, 1898 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
Died on 16th September 1970 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
His ashes are interred on Jersey, Channel Islands.
 
Private. 1st Battalion, King?s (Liverpool) Regiment.
London Gazetted upon 22nd May, 1918. 
Born on 3rd November, 1898 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
Died on 16th September 1970 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
His ashes are interred on Jersey, Channel Islands.
 
Named after him is the Jack Counter Close at St  Helier, Jersey.

 
Digest of Citation reads: 
 
On 16th April, 1918 near Boisieux St. Marc, France, it was necessary for information to be obtained from the front line and the only way to get it was over ground with no cover and in full view of the enemy. A small party tried without success, followed by six men, singly, each one being killed in the attempt. Private Counter then volunteered and, going out under terrific fire, got through and returned with vital information which enabled his commanding officer to organise and launch the final successful counter-attack. Subsequently he also carried five messages across the open under heavy artillery barrage to company headquarters.   His extraordinary courage in facing almost certain death produced a most excellent impression on his young and untried companions.
 
 
Private. 1st Battalion, King?s (Liverpool) Regiment.
London Gazetted upon 22nd May, 1918. 
Born on 3rd November, 1898 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
Died on 16th September 1970 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
His ashes are interred on Jersey, Channel Islands.
 
Named after him is the Jack Counter Close at St  Helier, Jersey.

 
Digest of Citation reads: 
 
On 16th April, 1918 near Boisieux St. Marc, France, it was necessary for information to be obtained from the front line and the only way to get it was over ground with no cover and in full view of the enemy. A small party tried without success, followed by six men, singly, each one being killed in the attempt. Private Counter then volunteered and, going out under terrific fire, got through and returned with vital information which enabled his commanding officer to organise and launch the final successful counter-attack. Subsequently he also carried five messages across the open under heavy artillery barrage to company headquarters.   His extraordinary courage in facing almost certain death produced a most excellent impression on his young and untried companions.
 

 

COUNTER, JACK
 
Private. 1st Battalion, King?s (Liverpool) Regiment.
London Gazetted upon 22nd May, 1918. 
Born on 3rd November, 1898 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
Died on 16th September 1970 at Blandford Forum, Dorset.
His ashes are interred on Jersey, Channel Islands.
 
Named after him is the Jack Counter Close at St  Helier, Jersey.

 
Digest of Citation reads: 
 
On 16th April, 1918 near Boisieux St. Marc, France, it was necessary for information to be obtained from the front line and the only way to get it was over ground with no cover and in full view of the enemy. A small party tried without success, followed by six men, singly, each one being killed in the attempt. Private Counter then volunteered and, going out under terrific fire, got through and returned with vital information which enabled his commanding officer to organise and launch the final successful counter-attack. Subsequently he also carried five messages across the open under heavy artillery barrage to company headquarters.   His extraordinary courage in facing almost certain death produced a most excellent impression on his young and untried companions.
 

                                                         Captain Noel Chavasse  RAMC

                                                     10th Battalion King?s LIVERPOOL

                                                                

 

Noel Godfrey Chavasse was born in Oxford on 9th November, 1884. His father, Francis Chavasse, became Bishop of Liverpool in 1900.

Chavasse was educated at Liverpool College and Trinity College Oxford After graduating with first class honours in 1907 he studied medicine. In 1908 Chavasse and his twin brother, Christopher, both represented Britain in the Olympic Games in the 400 metres.

In 1909 Chavasse joined the Oxford University Officer Training Corps Medical Unit. The following year he sat and passed the examination that allowed him to join the Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons. Chavasse worked in Dublin and the Royal Southern Hospital in Liverpool  before joining the Royal Army Medical Corps in 1913.

 Captain Noel Chavasse won two VC?s in World War One. Qualified as a doctor, Chavasse joined the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) when World War One broke out. His unit of the RAMC was attached to 10th Battalion King?s (Liverpool) Regiment which fought at the Battle of Hooge near Ypres in 1915. The ferocity of this battle was such that out of 900 men in the 10th battalion just 140 men and 2 officers survived. For his gallantry, Captain Chavasse was awarded the Military Cross. On Day 1 of the Battle of the Somme, the battalion was ordered to attack the fortified village of Guillemont. Along with many other units, the 10th battalion suffered major casualties. Chavasse tended as many of the wounded as he could even into the night- time. He was hit by shrapnel twice and on one occasion carried a wounded man 500 metres back to safety. Chavasse also collected as many dog tags as he could of men killed in the attack. The citation for his first VC stated: ?Altogether he saved the lives of some twenty badly wounded men, besides the ordinary cases which passed through his hands. His courage and self-sacrifice were beyond praise.? Chavasse received his VC from King George V in February 1917.
 
In July 1917, Chavasse saw action at the Battle of Passchendaele. With his men, he set up an advanced first-aid post in a captured German dugout. The Germans shelled this position and Chavasse was hit in the head, fracturing his skull. He received treatment for this serious injury and despite advice to the contrary, returned to his first-aid post. Further shelling led to two more head injuries. On his orders, stretcher-bearers took other wounded men back to relative safety, as Chavasse believed that he had to stay where he was to support men who were there. On August 2nd, 1917, another shell blast resulted in a severe stomach wound, which required treatment at a casualty clearing station. However, the wound was so severe that Chavasse died on August 4th aged 32. The citation for his second VC stated: ?Though severely wounded early in the action whilst carrying a wounded soldier to the dressing station, he refused to leave his post, and for two days not only continued to perform his duties but went out repeatedly under enemy fire to search for and attend to the wounded who were lying out. During these searches, although practically without food, he assisted to carry a number of badly wounded men over heavy and difficult ground. By his extraordinary energy and inspiring example he was instrumental in rescuing many who would have otherwise undoubtedly succumbed under the bad weather conditions.?
 
Chavasse was buried in the military cemetery at Brandhoek in Belgium. His headstone is the only one in the world engraved with two VC?s.   

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His medals                                                                      

                                                                                        

                                

                                                                  

            1908 Noel Chavasse and his twin brother, Christopher, both represented Britain in the Olympic's                                      

 Taken at Queen's Club. Noel Chavasse is on the right: his twin Christopher on the   left

 


 
 
 
Also received Russian Order of St George.
 
 
Lance-Corporal Tombs, on his own initiative, repeatedly made his way out under extremely heavy fire, from shell and machine-gun, in order to bring in some wounded men who were lying, approximately 100 yards, in front of our trenches. He managed to rescue four men, one of whom was so badly wounded that had he not received Medical attention, he surely would have died. Lance-Corporal Tombs dragged back by placing a rifle sling around the man's body and his own neck.  
Also received Russian Order of St George.

 

 


Private. 1st Battalion

2nd Battalion,