Rodaways of ww1-2

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                                                 inlaws

                       CPL/12444 JAMES HOPLEY HAROLD

                                 KINGS LIVERPOOL REGIMENT

  born 1870 Liverpool married  EMILY RODAWAY born 1874

         married in 1892,  5/children on 1911 census

                                  60 GILL ST WEST DERBY

                   ELIZABETH , JAMES ,EDITH, ALBERT, and JESSIE

  he came home from the war wounded a butcher by trade  died sept 1927

  HENRY RODAWAY lived with emily and james at 56 gill st and was buried 25/8/1930  with 1 other in  the grave,  owner is  listed as edith may,

                                                 medal card

                                                                PALS  OLD AND NEW

    

RSM ROBERT HOY.  2BN NORFOLK REGIMENT  

FOUGHT IN THE RETREAT OF DUNKIRK THEN OVER TO BURMA, WONDERFUL MAN LOVES A SOUTHERN COMFORT .

veterans week BLACKPOOL,said he was only a young one,compaired to HARRY ALLINGHAM 

HONORARY LIFE MEMBER THE LAYTON INSTITUTE BLACKPOOL.

                PTE 3710515 CHARLES RODAWAY L.N.LANCS

 Charlie celebrated his 100th birthday  12th march this year 2016,  

                     

Charles Rodaway 2nd LOYAL NORTH REGIMENT WW2                                  

 CHARLIE WAS CAPTURED AT THE FALL OF SINGAPORE IN FEB 1942                         

 I have add the pleasure of  a drink or two with him and his wife Sheila in BLACKPOOL he was sentenced to death along with his pal William nifty SMITH they were saying goodbye to each other when the firing squad downed rifles and marched off  

 

Statement of Everett D. Reamer

Solitary Cell September 18, 1944-August 22, 1945
Sakai Prison built in 1927 of brick construction. Solitary cells were isolated and
very small with a solid door having a screened slot for viewing prisoners.
There was no heat or fan; no water, a wooden pail for a toilet, one light hung from
the ceiling, a small barred window at the rear of the cell.
My clothing was one thin shirt, one thin trousers, no shoes or socks, no jacket or
kimono as indicated in the report. No wooden box, only the floor to sit on. Only one thin blanket for cover ? not two as indicated in the report. I was required to sit all day on the floor, lying down was permitted only between the hours of 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. Meals were assigned numbers 1 through 7. One being the largest amount ? seven being the smallest. I received a #5 ration, not a #3 as indicated.
Bathing was usually allowed once a month; no soap, no wash cloth or towel, no
clean clothing. Refer to three barrels in the report.
Exercise was in the yard ? not every day as indicated. We were lucky if we were
allowed to exercise twice a month. We were fortunate to be able to exercise with the foreign civilians, most of whom were fluent in Japanese and other languages, including English. It was from these foreign civilians that we learned a little about the progress of the war (on the sly, of course).
My hands and feet were frozen in January 1945. No medical help was offered. I
laid down during the day to get attention. My cell door would be opened and I would be beaten for not sitting up. After serious infection from frost bite, the warden spoke in English and asked me what was wrong. When I told him about the frost bite infection,he ordered me taken to the medical station, where I got some relief and returned to my cell. I was later beaten by the two medical techs at the medical station. As stated, during air attacks, I was handcuffed with hands behind my back and left in my cell.
Eight (8) Allied POW?s were in Solitary at Osaka Sakai Prison:
Everett D. Reamer U.S. Army From Osaka Camp #1
Louis J. Bradsher U.S. Army Osaka Camp #1
Robert A. Newton U.S. Marine Corps Zentsugi Camp
Francis J. Joslin U.S. Army Unknown ? not Osaka #1
William H. Smith British Army Unknown
Charles A. Rodaway British Army Unknown
Gary DeVoss Dutch Army Unknown
Ben Magdon U.S. Army Unknown
Eight (8) Civilians in Solitary at Osaka Sakai Prison:
1 Russian Prisoner (name unknown) spoke several languages
1 Russian Prisoner (name unknown) spoke only Russian
1 German Prisoner (name unknown) spoke English, Japanese (was tortured)
1 German Prisoner ? Herbert Wellweber spoke English, Japanese
1 Dutch Prisoner (name unknown) spoke English, Japanese
1 Dutch Prisoner (name unknown) died in prison 1945
1 French Prisoner (name unknown) spoke English, Japanese
1 unknown nationality ? Mike Bonifer spoke several languages
To survive being in Solitary Confinement, and with no amenities and little food, frequent abuse and constant insults speaks volumes of the will to survive, and most of us did until our recovery on August 22, 1945.
Everett D. Reamer, P.O.W. (U.S. Army)
Final prison cell #13 Prison #1589
                                            
            

                                 Charlie, after the war meeting up with L/R  Norman Craven of Manchester, Reggie Hunt of Blackpool, Charles Rodaway., Jack Broughton and his wife Ida of Cheshire.

                        birthday card  from Charlie to Nifty, turns out Charlie was a very good artist 

                               Charlie and granddaughter Heather Garriock  is 100 birthday 12/3/2016

   During is youth, Charlie went to sea on the Fleetwood Trawler  Swan  this would be the second one the first was sunk in 1921   being late for setting off on a later trip he was told to go and find another ship,  Charlie told me he was not that bothered he never liked it anyway,  so he went to work for the  Isle of Man Steam Packet Company  on         THE LADY OF MANN   not often you get a photo  of a ship  going backwards ,and Fleetwood trawler Swan going the right way.

 

                                               POW EXTRAS

                     EVERETT  D REAMER WITH  TORU FUKUBAYASHI 

 Everett and Toru at the former site of Osaka POW Camp

        Testimony of Everett Reamer-

 At Osaka Camp #1 our room was approximately 20 feet from the storeroom where Red Cross food parcels were stored. Our group often saw the Japanese, including Lt. Matsumora, helping themselves to those supplies. A group of us, six including myself, decided to attempt to get a few parcels for ourselves, noting that the Japanese had for some time been withholding the Red Cross food parcels from us--for whom they were intended.
We drew straws to see what participation each of us would undertake. I drew the shortest and was designated as #1 and ended up being the one to enter the storeroom. (Each room had a man on duty from approx 8pm til 6am every night - not for fire watch as was stated by Sanders - but to prevent more than one man leaving the room at the same time for toilet reasons.)
The #2 man was designated to unlock the storeroom door adjacent to the toilet area with a forged key that had been made by one of the original six men. I stood guard while #2 man went and unlocked the storeroom door. (This room had both doors at front and rear to toilet area.)
After unlocking the storeroom door, #2 man came back to the room, I then went into the storeroom and got a couple of parcels of Red Cross food and placed the parcels in the toilet. Japanese guards noticed the light being out in the toilet and came to investigate. I managed to elude them and went back to my room without any food parcel.
The Japanese guards followed on the run. They did not recognize me but saw that I went into Room #6. The #2 man was back on guard duty, they demanded that he tell them who had just entered the room, and when he refused to identify me, they beat him severely.As I stated in my statement after the war, food was cut off to Room 6. No one in the room was being fed.

After 3 days, but without any pressure from the men in Room 6, I went to Sanders and told him that I and Bradsher (the #2 man) were involved in attempting to get Red Cross food parcels from the storeroom. I asked him to do whatever he could to get the men in Room #6 fed, but for God's sake, not to turn us over to the Japanese.
The following morning when lining up for work details, Sanders pointed out both Bradsher and me to Lt. Matsumora. Bradsher and I were escorted back into camp. Twenty-eight days of torture followed and on September 18, 1944, I and Bradsher were escorted under guard to Japanese Army Headquarters in Osaka for sentencing. We were sentenced to solitary confinement at Osaka Sakai Prison and remained there until August 22, 1945.
It is interesting to note that the most severe punishment and torture at Osaka Camp #1 is not mentioned in Sanders' deposition that you sent to me. The fact that he chose to turn Bradsher and me over to the Japanese tells me that he was more loyal to the Japanese than he was to the POW's at Osaka Camp #1.
His own Court Martial by the U.S. was pursued, but with limited success. The navy medic, who always attempted to stand up for us P.O.W.'s knows the true story, as well as a letter I have from S/Sgt Mickey Ryan that expresses the same. Mickey Ryan has been deceased for several years, and I have also lost touch with the Navy Medic who used to live in Florida.
Osaka Main

http://www.mansell.com/pow_resources/camplists/osaka/chikko/chikko-main.htm

http://steveandmarciaontherock.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/constance-cowan-meets-everett-reamer.html

http://www.us-japandialogueonpows.org/Reamertrip.htm


At Osaka Camp #1 our room was approximately 20 feet from the storeroom where Red Cross food parcels were stored. Our group often saw the Japanese, including Lt. Matsumora, helping themselves to those supplies. A group of us, six including myself, decided to attempt to get a few parcels for ourselves, noting that the Japanese had for some time been withholding the Red Cross food parcels from us--for whom they were intended.

We drew straws to see what participation each of us would undertake. I drew the shortest and was designated as #1 and ended up being the one to enter the storeroom. (Each room had a man on duty from approx 8pm til 6am every night - not for fire watch as was stated by Sanders - but to prevent more than one man leaving the room at the same time for toilet reasons.)

The #2 man was designated to unlock the storeroom door adjacent to the toilet area with a forged key that had been made by one of the original six men. I stood guard while #2 man went and unlocked the storeroom door. (This room had both doors at front and rear to toilet area.)

After unlocking the storeroom door, #2 man came back to the room, I then went into the storeroom and got a couple of parcels of Red Cross food and placed the parcels in the toilet. Japanese guards noticed the light being out in the toilet and came to investigate. I managed to elude them and went back to my room without any food parcel.

The Japanese guards followed on the run. They did not recognize me but saw that I went into Room #6. The #2 man was back on guard duty, they demanded that he tell them who had just entered the room, and when he refused to identify me, they beat him severely.

As I stated in my statement after the war, food was cut off to Room 6. No one in the room was being fed.

After 3 days, but without any pressure from the men in Room 6, I went to Sanders and told him that I and Bradsher (the #2 man) were involved in attempting to get Red Cross food parcels from the storeroom. I asked him to do whatever he could to get the men in Room #6 fed, but for God's sake, not to turn us over to the Japanese. 

The following morning when lining up for work details, Sanders pointed out both Bradsher and me to Lt. Matsumora. Bradsher and I were escorted back into camp. Twenty-eight days of torture followed and on September 18, 1944, I and Bradsher were escorted under guard to Japanese Army Headquarters in Osaka for sentencing. We were sentenced to solitary confinement at Osaka Sakai Prison and remained there until August 22, 1945.

It is interesting to note that the most severe punishment and torture at Osaka Camp #1 is not mentioned in Sanders' deposition that you sent to me. The fact that he chose to turn Bradsher and me over to the Japanese tells me that he was more loyal to the Japanese than he was to the POW's at Osaka Camp #1.

His own Court Martial by the U.S. was pursued, but with limited success. The navy medic, who always attempted to stand up for us P.O.W.'s knows the true story, as well as a letter I have from S/Sgt Mickey Ryan that expresses the same. Mickey Ryan has been deceased for several years, and I have also lost touch with the Navy Medic who used to live in Florida.
Osaka Main

http://www.mansell.com/pow_resources/camplists/osaka/chikko/chikko-main.htm

http://steveandmarciaontherock.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/constance-cowan-meets-everett-reamer.html

http://www.us-japandialogueonpows.org/Reamertrip.htm
                        FLEETWOOD TRAWLER LADYLOVE

          SUNK 7-9-1941 BY UBOAT  U202  ICELAND 14 LOSSED

                      JOHN THOMAS ROSSALL AGE 32 DECK HAND  

                          WIFE GERT ROSSALL OF BLACKPOOL

                           PANAL 126 TOWER HILL MEMORIAL

          UBOAT.NET RECORDS HAVE HER SUNK ON THE 27/AUG/41

                    COMMANDER  HANS HEINZ LINDER U202

                                                                    

                                PALS OF THE PRINS

  

                                  KEN OAKLEY

                     SEPT/1921-OCT/2007 

               http://www.freewebs.com/rickles23/                                                       

              

 http://www.historynet.com/royal-navy-commandos-in-world-war-ii.htm/2

           THE SALERNO LANDINGS  BY  ROYAL MARINE COMMANDO KEN OAKLEY             SEE LINK HISTORYNET.COM

 

 pow ww2  A.A.RODAWAY

Name:     A. A. Rodaway
Rank:    Serjeant Major
Army Number:    7364438
Regiment:    Royal Signals
POW Number:    251833
Camp Type:    Stalag
Camp Number:    IV-C
Camp Location:    Bystrice, Czech Republic
Record Office:    Royal Signals Record Office, Caversham, Reading, Berkshire
Record Office Number:    10

BOAR WAR

Rodaway George  Alfred Source: QSA and KSA medal rolls Southern Rhodesian Volunteers

B387 George Alfred Rodaway i. He is also on the QSA roll for the Cape Railway Sharpshooters with number 1155 and entitlement to the CC clasp again.
birth June 1879   Newport, M. this is I believe the right G.A.RODAWAY    who died in ww1,  

ROYAL MARINE IVOR TURNER

 IVOR was attached to the 46th royal marine commando, y troop who went over on the Prins Albert D/DAY JUNE 6th 1944 and landed on the 7th, photo's sent to me from IVOR  JUNE 27th 2013

                             

                                                                                  IVOR on street patrol

                            OSNABRUCK  Lower Saxony, Germany  227 miles or 365.24 KMS from BERLIN.

                                        

 IVOR CENTRE FRONT ROW

                                   

Albany barracks ISLE OF WHITE,CHRISTMAS1942 BACK,LAST RIGHT

 Back row l-r: 1. W. Brettle (wounded); 2. J. Atkinson (wounded); 3. Morris (left before Achnacarry *); 4. Ivor Tuner.

Front row l-r:1. C. Beveridge (wounded); 2. n/k (left before Achnacarry *); 3. J. McVeighty; 4. J. Pizey (kia); 5. Miller (wounded **)


                                IVOR, FIRST LEFT BEHIND POLICEMAN

 

 Canadian  RODAWAY'S   work in progress

 LT-COL JOHN RODAWAY 1988-92 The Lorne Scots is a Primary Reserve infantry regiment of the Canadian Army. It is part of the 4th Canadian Division